2006.03.04-1

EMF and RFR: Where You’re Exposed and What to Do:

Layna Berman, host and producer of Your Own Health and Fitness on KPFA and the Pacifica Network, will interview environmental consultant, Cindy Sage, and science journalist and author, B. Blake Levitt, on the disturbing science showing wireless technology’s dangers to humans and the environment. Included will be practical alternatives and protection from electrosmog exposures.

Layna Berman, host and producer of Your Own Health and Fitness on KPFA and the Pacifica Network, will interview environmental consultant, Cindy Sage, and science journalist and author, B. Blake Levitt, on the disturbing science showing wireless technology’s dangers to humans and the environment. Included will be practical alternatives and protection from electrosmog exposures.
Air Time is Tuesday, 3/14/06 from 1-2 PST (Pacific Standard Time)
To listen live, go to the KFPA web site and follow the links to listen live to Your Own Health and Fitness. The program will be archived on Your Own Health and Fitness website, available 24/7, for one week. Click on “LISTEN to the latest show”.

Information and Resources:
Blake Levitt’s website
Layna Berman’s website
Janet Newton, EMR Policy Institute
Cindy Sage’s website

Mitigation information:
EMF Safety Superstore

YSHIELD: EMR-Protection

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2006.03.31

WiFi’s Electic Shock

Below are excerpts from a recent Canadian article about WiFi. You can read the entire article at: WiFi’s Electrical Shock

Shivani

Wi-Fi’s electric shock

NOW magazine, Toronto March 9, 2006, by ADRIA VASIL

Whether it’s fluorescent lights, cellphones or computer screens, more and more of us are realizing that the technology we’ve welcomed into our homes and offices is making us ill. According to stats from Sweden and Britain, about 2 or 3 per cent of the population suffers from potentially debilitating electro-hypersensitivity, or EHS. Symptoms are all over the map, and include nausea, headaches, chronic fatigue, chronic pain, tinnitus and rashes, to name a few. Researchers also say that many more, over a third of us, are a little electro-sensitive and just don’t know it, blaming restless nights, office brain fog and Motrin moments on everything but our electrified environment.

Dave Stetzer, a Wisconsin-based electrical engineer, says cordless phones make plenty of people sick. In fact, the consultant recommends people with sensitivities not only get rid of their cordless phones, but also toss their dimmer switches, energy-efficient fluorescent bulbs, halogen lights and, yes, baby monitors. The link between them all? Radio frequencies. We know that wireless technology like cellphones and Wi-Fi emit such frequencies. But Stetzer explains that radio frequency surges created by appliances are also riding the electrical wiring in your home when they shouldn’t be.

Magda Havas, an environmental science professor at Trent, has been studying just that. Havas teaches a course on the biological impact of electromagnetic radiation and radio frequencies – the only one of its kind in Canada. Her work with people with MS, diabetes and other illnesses documents how many found their symptoms improved when their environments were electrically cleaned, so to speak, by placing capacitators (filters) throughout their homes. Brad Blumbergs has progressive multiple sclerosis and says he walked with a cane until he volunteered for Havas’s experiment. Michelle Illiatovitch’s daughter suffered from chronic fatigue from the time she was eight and saw her energy return once an electrician fixed some faulty wiring in their home and filters were put in her North York school. Explains Havas,”We can take a person who is diabetic and put them in an [electrically] dirty environment, and their blood sugar levels rise. We then put them into a clean environment, and within half an hour their blood sugar levels are lower. It becomes a barometer.”

Columbia cellular biophysics prof Martin Blank (says})that electromagnetic waves and radio frequencies actually trigger stress responses in cells. “If you need any more evidence that the body is telling you, ‘I’m hurting,’ this is it,” says Blank. “That’s what the stress response is – it’s the testimony of the cells.” And that response, he adds, is activated by very weak fields, not just the kinds emitted by major transmission lines, but the kind inundating your home. “Who knows what being exposed to [multiple sources] simultaneously does? You’ve got TV broadcasting outside, you’ve got cellphones broadcasting outside. God knows what’s going on with all these things coming and going together. There’s no attempt to deal with it except in the vaguest way.” And Wi-Fi? Blank says he wouldn’t want it in his home. Bottom line, says the prof, “the guys who say they’re protecting us with these standards are not protecting us.”

“I wonder how many people out there are being misdiagnosed,” asks MartinWeatherall, a retired Toronto cop who started developing a ringing in his ears and headaches when he moved into a new home. “They’re being harmed by their electrical environments, and doctors are just sending them to a psychiatrist.”

Toronto Hydro’s website encourages anyone concerned to move clock radios away from their bed and to air dry for a few minutes after bathing to cut down on hair dryer time. Kind of strange for a company that says there’s nothing to worry about.

Sweden, with an estimated 250,000 sufferers, leads the pack by recognizing EHS as a full-on disability. Authorities there will not only electrically retrofit your home and your office, but will make a restaurant remove, say, offensive lighting if an electrically sensitive person wants to eat there but can’t – kind of like Canada’s policy on wheelchair ramps. Stockholm’s even planning a special EHS-friendly village. A little closer to home, Lakehead University in Thunder Bay recently shocked onlookers by banning wireless Internet from most of its campus. A controversial move in these parts, but school prez Fred Gilbert says the jury’s still out on Wi-Fi’s health impact. That, he says, is enough to justify a precautionary approach.

“You run a certain risk if you go against the wave of implementation,” says Gilbert. “But I think…when you can do something to avoid exposure … I think we’re making the right decision.” Warren Bell sits on the board of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment.

He says, “Our industrial civilization has embarked on a lot of courses without a lot of documentation on their safety or lack of safety. As a result, we’ve got ourselves in a number of different corners, something we have subsequently come to regret.”

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